asbestos gelos









Leslie Chang, USC '15. It is a pleasure to meet you.



rolandalfred2nd:

kelleyboomerang:

unsubstantiatedrumors:

Hero.

Most of you have probably already read this, but this is so, so important. I think it’s a damn shame that the name of the Aurora shooter or the marathon bombers is common knowledge but not the name of this brave young man.
His father said that, “He made his mother cry, but he saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”
I can’t imagine such pure selflessness. I remember when I was 15, and I couldn’t have done something like this. I don’t think I’m even this selfless now.
Young heroes like Aitzaz and Malala give me hope for Pakistan, and the world. They’re the change that we need. They’re the people who you should judge Islam by, not the extremists. I know I don’t have that many followers, but please, for anyone who reads this today, spare a moment to think about this young hero and his grieving family.

Wow

rolandalfred2nd:

kelleyboomerang:

unsubstantiatedrumors:

Hero.

Most of you have probably already read this, but this is so, so important. I think it’s a damn shame that the name of the Aurora shooter or the marathon bombers is common knowledge but not the name of this brave young man.

His father said that, “He made his mother cry, but he saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”

I can’t imagine such pure selflessness. I remember when I was 15, and I couldn’t have done something like this. I don’t think I’m even this selfless now.

Young heroes like Aitzaz and Malala give me hope for Pakistan, and the world. They’re the change that we need. They’re the people who you should judge Islam by, not the extremists. I know I don’t have that many followers, but please, for anyone who reads this today, spare a moment to think about this young hero and his grieving family.

Wow

(via randomfactory)


hyaena13:

themoo-n:

kinkyturtle:

avri-wallflower:

sourcedumal:

Fuck special snowflakes who think like this.
Gurl bye
Your ass ain’t fucking special because you don’t wear makeup.
You’re not fucking better than the woman with large breasts who wears tank tops.
You’re a piece of shit because you are putting sexist stereotypes onto other women in some anti-feminine bullshit.

If you don’t like it, why’d you comment on it? I think it’s awesome and you’re probably one of the girls up there that wears makeup and shortshorts and tiny tanktops. And most kids today wear makeup because they think they aren’t pretty and need it. So deal with it. And get over yourself.

girl bye.
lemme tell you something: I wear tons of fucking make up. I wear short dresses. I walk around with a face that looks about as fake as it can get outside of a fucking barbie doll. and I like it that way. and, despite what you seem to think, no, it’s not because i think i’m ugly. i just fucking like makeup (and trust, i’ve spent years examining my own motivations and how they’re tied to internalized self-hated, fatphobia and misogyny so don’t EVEN cause you don’t know what you’re talking about).
I also read ravenously; engage in discourse regarding philosphy, art, economics, politics, race, gender, sexuality; make subversive art; and love comics and film and music. I’M A FUCKING PERSON IS WHAT I’M SAYING. 
like how fucking deep is this goddamn image when the spine of the book JUST SAYS THE WORD ‘BOOK’.
this kind of bullshit narrative, other than furthering a misogynistic dichotomy that pits women against each other, is also a complete fucking fallacy. A huge majority of average women DON’T DO THIS. you aren’t the lone plain jane in an army of cake-faced, bottle blonde barbies—if you look around, you’ll see that most women just throw on jeans and tops and very little makeup. 
I get that this kind of shit is an attempt to fight back against media-made images of what womanhood is supposed to be. I get it. (thought isn’t it interesting that the “weirdo” in the picture is still thin and conventionally attractive??)
but attacking other women who you perceive as being stupid or carbon copies because of their fucking appearance doesn’t fight back against shit. it actually does EXACTLY what the patriarchy wants us to do—engenders more hatred and competition between women. 
but you know, whatever, continue to think you’re so goddamn special. i’ll be over here reading AND wearing hot pink lipstick and having a hell of a time doing it. 

THIS IS THE BEST FUCKING THING I’VE EVER READ IN THE HISTORY OF EVER

And that is how you tear a fake feminist to shreds. Bravo.

hyaena13:

themoo-n:

kinkyturtle:

avri-wallflower:

sourcedumal:

Fuck special snowflakes who think like this.

Gurl bye

Your ass ain’t fucking special because you don’t wear makeup.

You’re not fucking better than the woman with large breasts who wears tank tops.

You’re a piece of shit because you are putting sexist stereotypes onto other women in some anti-feminine bullshit.

If you don’t like it, why’d you comment on it? I think it’s awesome and you’re probably one of the girls up there that wears makeup and shortshorts and tiny tanktops. And most kids today wear makeup because they think they aren’t pretty and need it. So deal with it. And get over yourself.

girl bye.

lemme tell you something: I wear tons of fucking make up. I wear short dresses. I walk around with a face that looks about as fake as it can get outside of a fucking barbie doll. and I like it that way. and, despite what you seem to think, no, it’s not because i think i’m ugly. i just fucking like makeup (and trust, i’ve spent years examining my own motivations and how they’re tied to internalized self-hated, fatphobia and misogyny so don’t EVEN cause you don’t know what you’re talking about).

I also read ravenously; engage in discourse regarding philosphy, art, economics, politics, race, gender, sexuality; make subversive art; and love comics and film and music. I’M A FUCKING PERSON IS WHAT I’M SAYING. 

like how fucking deep is this goddamn image when the spine of the book JUST SAYS THE WORD ‘BOOK’.

this kind of bullshit narrative, other than furthering a misogynistic dichotomy that pits women against each other, is also a complete fucking fallacy. A huge majority of average women DON’T DO THIS. you aren’t the lone plain jane in an army of cake-faced, bottle blonde barbies—if you look around, you’ll see that most women just throw on jeans and tops and very little makeup. 

I get that this kind of shit is an attempt to fight back against media-made images of what womanhood is supposed to be. I get it. (thought isn’t it interesting that the “weirdo” in the picture is still thin and conventionally attractive??)

but attacking other women who you perceive as being stupid or carbon copies because of their fucking appearance doesn’t fight back against shit. it actually does EXACTLY what the patriarchy wants us to do—engenders more hatred and competition between women. 

but you know, whatever, continue to think you’re so goddamn special. i’ll be over here reading AND wearing hot pink lipstick and having a hell of a time doing it. 

THIS IS THE BEST FUCKING THING I’VE EVER READ IN THE HISTORY OF EVER

And that is how you tear a fake feminist to shreds. Bravo.

(via randomfactory)


Not even done with finals yet 

Not even done with finals yet 


portraitsofboston:

“At the moment, I’m homeless.”“I thought you were waiting for someone.”“I’m just trying to pass the time. I live in a shelter.”"How did you become homeless?”“I had a place, but I smoke, and I wasn’t supposed to.”“What’s your typical day like?”“I wake up because the lights come on in the shelter. You’ve got an hour to wash your body and do everything, and you have to do it on a schedule. Then, if you’re hungry … well, you don’t really want to eat the food there. It sucks. Anyway, you eat. They offer you oatmeal or eggs or cream of wheat.” “When do you have to be out?”“In the shelter I am, you have to be out of the building by 9 o’clock. Then you have to be in before 6 o’clock.  You can go back during the day. But it makes me feel so, so unmanly because I have to answer to someone all the time. Sometimes I stay in the shelter in the daytime. I have a couple of my art pieces there. I hang out there half the day. Then I go to the library and read. Time passes quickly.”“Can you afford to buy your own food?”“Yes. I have money to eat elsewhere. And I choose not to eat at the shelter because I don’t want to take the food from a homeless person who needs it more.” “Do you have friends or family?“"I have two children.”“Do you see them?”“Not too often. I love them. They love me. I’m divorced.”“You said you had some art pieces.”“I’m an artist. I paint. I studied art history.”“What do you paint?”“Mostly portraits. I like people’s eyes.” “Have you exhibited somewhere?”“I used to exhibit on Newbury Street and elsewhere.”“When was that?” “About 20 years ago.”“And then what happened?”“Well, I also drink. I spent a lot of money on going out and partying.”“Do you hope to get back into the art world?”“That’s my dream. You know, you made my day. Why did you pick me? I feel so proud. I will always remember this date. I’m a homeless, highly educated black man who drinks. I’m homeless because I smoke. I never hurt anyone, never stole, never lied, never cheated. I’m so happy you talked to me. It awoke in me an aspect of humanity I had long forgotten. I feel so honored. Why me?”

portraitsofboston:

“At the moment, I’m homeless.”
“I thought you were waiting for someone.”
“I’m just trying to pass the time. I live in a shelter.”
"How did you become homeless?”
“I had a place, but I smoke, and I wasn’t supposed to.”
“What’s your typical day like?”
“I wake up because the lights come on in the shelter. You’ve got an hour to wash your body and do everything, and you have to do it on a schedule. Then, if you’re hungry … well, you don’t really want to eat the food there. It sucks. Anyway, you eat. They offer you oatmeal or eggs or cream of wheat.” 
“When do you have to be out?”
“In the shelter I am, you have to be out of the building by 9 o’clock. Then you have to be in before 6 o’clock.  You can go back during the day. But it makes me feel so, so unmanly because I have to answer to someone all the time. Sometimes I stay in the shelter in the daytime. I have a couple of my art pieces there. I hang out there half the day. Then I go to the library and read. Time passes quickly.”
“Can you afford to buy your own food?”
“Yes. I have money to eat elsewhere. And I choose not to eat at the shelter because I don’t want to take the food from a homeless person who needs it more.” 
“Do you have friends or family?“
"I have two children.”
“Do you see them?”
“Not too often. I love them. They love me. I’m divorced.”
“You said you had some art pieces.”
“I’m an artist. I paint. I studied art history.”
“What do you paint?”
“Mostly portraits. I like people’s eyes.” 
“Have you exhibited somewhere?”
“I used to exhibit on Newbury Street and elsewhere.”
“When was that?”
“About 20 years ago.”
“And then what happened?”
“Well, I also drink. I spent a lot of money on going out and partying.”
“Do you hope to get back into the art world?”
“That’s my dream. You know, you made my day. Why did you pick me? I feel so proud. I will always remember this date. I’m a homeless, highly educated black man who drinks. I’m homeless because I smoke. I never hurt anyone, never stole, never lied, never cheated. I’m so happy you talked to me. It awoke in me an aspect of humanity I had long forgotten. I feel so honored. Why me?”

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


I do not agree with this photo at all—It illustrates the extent to which Americans remove themselves from situations and point fingers at everyone but themselves. Natural disasters are what they are: Natural. But the extent of humankind’s excess and blatant disregard for the environment is exacerbating the intensity and frequency of earth’s course of action and it’s actually ludicrous to think that the destruction wreaked upon the Philippines had nothing to do with the United States.
This is one of the poorest political cartoons I’ve ever had the displeasure of seeing and I am sorely disappointed.     

I do not agree with this photo at all—It illustrates the extent to which Americans remove themselves from situations and point fingers at everyone but themselves. Natural disasters are what they are: Natural. But the extent of humankind’s excess and blatant disregard for the environment is exacerbating the intensity and frequency of earth’s course of action and it’s actually ludicrous to think that the destruction wreaked upon the Philippines had nothing to do with the United States.

This is one of the poorest political cartoons I’ve ever had the displeasure of seeing and I am sorely disappointed.     

(Source: political-cartoons, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)



headfirstintowonderland:

so someone once called my old english teacher immature (because at this point he was spinning around on a wheely chair) and he said:

“Yeah, but the truth is we never really grow up. We just masquerade as adults because that’s what we’re expected to do.”


and to this day that is the single most profound thing i have ever heard uttered by someone dicking around on a swivel chair

(via randomfactory)


slaycinder:

jpgay:

i hate when a more attractive person has a crush on the same person i do

It’s like performing in a talent show and finding out that Beyonce is going on before you

(via alextraordinary)


ask-the-son-of-liberty:

Sit down John! 

ask-the-son-of-liberty:

Sit down John! 

(via randomfactory)


(I am working the register over Christmas.)
Me: “Find everything today?”
Customer: “Yup.”
(Note: she is silent through the transaction, which includes a gift card.)
Me: “How much would you like on this?”
Customer: “Oh, sorry. Can I have $150?”
Me: “No problem.”
Customer: *after paying* “Can you do me a favor?” *she hands me the gift card* “The next customer you see that you think could use this, could you give it to them?”
Me: *stunned* “…Of course!”
(After a minute another customer comes up, a visibly upset young woman.)
Me: “Hi! How are you?”
Customer #2: “I’m okay, thanks.”
(Clearly she is not ok, but she is trying very hard to be pleasant. She is getting very basic items: milk, bread, eggs, etc. Nothing very festive.)
Me: “So your total comes out to $0.00.”
Customer: “What?”
Me: “The person before you gave me a $150 gift card to use for the next person I thought could use it. You look like you’re having a rough day, so here are your groceries, and there’s about $130 left on this card.”
(The customer just started crying. Once she could, she thanked me about 100 times. Made my whole Christmas season.)

themajesticmountainscold:

moffats-army:

theuppitynegras:

siuilaruin:

aria-brook:

gentlenight:

wallflowersperk:

penchant-for-raising-cain:

“You fight like a girl.”

I’m sorry

image

I didn’t

image

realise

image

that 

image

was 

image

a

image

bad

image

thing

image

Reblogging because I’m sure the comic readers out there could add some more.

image

yeah

image

so sorry

image

i can’t hear you

image

over the sound

image

of me crushing my enemies

image

This list

image

was looking

image

a little

image

white

image

so here you go

image

image

watch tha

image

bodies hit

image

tha floor

image

this is the best post on tumblr, hands down

(via randomfactory)


bbz:


Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:
If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.
Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.
Emergency support
The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.
The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.
CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.
Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.
Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.
Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.
Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.
Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.
The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.
Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.
Food and water
The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.
Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.
World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.
Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.
Shelter
ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.
Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.
Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.
Medical assistance
Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.
International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.
More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.
Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.
Helping children
The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.
Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.
Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.
Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.
Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:

If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.

Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.

Emergency support

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.

The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.

CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.

Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.

Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.

Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.

Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.

Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.

Food and water

The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.

Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.

World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.

Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.

Shelter

ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.

Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.

Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.

Medical assistance

Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.

International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.

More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.

Helping children

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.

Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.

Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.

Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

(via dreamingashin)



fawrel:

live-out-faith:

doctorpotterbaggins:

There has been a terrible lack of posts recognizing the Philippine Typhoon and that’s why I’m making this post. The Philippines just had the WORST typhoon in history called, Haiyan. Now if you have no idea about the severity, the wind speeds of this typhoon was about 250 mph, which is THREE AND A HALF TIMES THE SPEED OF THE WINDS OF HURRICANE KATRINA. imagine the damage Katrina did to the US, a developed country. The Philippines is a Third world country. Most of the people in this country live in SHACKS MADE OUT OF TRASH. It is estimated that about 10,000 PEOPLE DIED. Dead bodies literally litter the streets and are STUCK IN TREES. IF YOU GIVE ANY SHITS TODAY ABOUT FELLOW HUMANITY YOU BETTER REBLOG THIS. IM NOT ONLY DOING THIS BECAUSE MY FAMILY IS FILIPINO BUT BECAUSE THIS STORM WAS THE WORST IN HISTORY. GOD BLESS THE SOULS LOST THERE. My parents were seriously almost on the verge of tears and almost screaming. We didn’t lose anybody in our family, but it has got to hurt to know that the place you came from is IN SHAMBLES. Pls spread this if you care

I’m raising money for Philippines Relief. My parents spent time in Philippines while they were young adults, studying there and seeing that some place they spent some time of their life there in ruins is saddening. Please help donate whether it be $2 or $20 or $50, all proceeds go towards the red cross fund. We also have special prizes that you may be entered into a draw for with each donation you make. Every little penny counts. 
Donate here: http://www.gofundme.com/57d9vg

SIGNAL BOOST PEOPLE I DON’T CARE IF THIS ISN’T UNDER YOUR BLOG STYLE JUST HELP US SPREAD THE WORD AND GAIN DONATIONS PLS IM BEGGING YOU

fawrel:

live-out-faith:

doctorpotterbaggins:

There has been a terrible lack of posts recognizing the Philippine Typhoon and that’s why I’m making this post. The Philippines just had the WORST typhoon in history called, Haiyan. Now if you have no idea about the severity, the wind speeds of this typhoon was about 250 mph, which is THREE AND A HALF TIMES THE SPEED OF THE WINDS OF HURRICANE KATRINA. imagine the damage Katrina did to the US, a developed country. The Philippines is a Third world country. Most of the people in this country live in SHACKS MADE OUT OF TRASH. It is estimated that about 10,000 PEOPLE DIED. Dead bodies literally litter the streets and are STUCK IN TREES. IF YOU GIVE ANY SHITS TODAY ABOUT FELLOW HUMANITY YOU BETTER REBLOG THIS. IM NOT ONLY DOING THIS BECAUSE MY FAMILY IS FILIPINO BUT BECAUSE THIS STORM WAS THE WORST IN HISTORY. GOD BLESS THE SOULS LOST THERE. My parents were seriously almost on the verge of tears and almost screaming. We didn’t lose anybody in our family, but it has got to hurt to know that the place you came from is IN SHAMBLES. Pls spread this if you care

I’m raising money for Philippines Relief. My parents spent time in Philippines while they were young adults, studying there and seeing that some place they spent some time of their life there in ruins is saddening. Please help donate whether it be $2 or $20 or $50, all proceeds go towards the red cross fund. We also have special prizes that you may be entered into a draw for with each donation you make. Every little penny counts. 

Donate here: http://www.gofundme.com/57d9vg

SIGNAL BOOST PEOPLE I DON’T CARE IF THIS ISN’T UNDER YOUR BLOG STYLE JUST HELP US SPREAD THE WORD AND GAIN DONATIONS PLS IM BEGGING YOU

(via randomfactory)